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BBC World News America

News/Business. U.S.-targeted nightly newscast. (CC) (Stereo)

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PBS

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00:30:00

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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Comcast Cable

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Channel 18 (147 MHz)

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mpeg2video

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ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
1920

PIXEL HEIGHT
1080

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Hugo Chavez 7, Eisenhower 7, U.s. 6, Us 6, Mumbai 5, America 5, Daniel Tiger 5, Daniel 4, Britain 3, Richard Nixon 3, Venezuela 3, United Healthcare 2, Pbs 2, India 2, Thailand 2, Dwight Eisenhower 2, Tigey 2, Chavez 2, Nixon 1, Here 1,
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  PBS    BBC World News America    News/Business. U.S.-targeted  
   nightly newscast. (CC) (Stereo)  

    February 18, 2013
    4:00 - 4:30pm PST  

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cancer surgery. it is the role he will play in caracas that is under question. >> outside the hospital where hugo chavez is being treated, supporters are celebrating. after two months of treatment in is comingommandante back. >> i asked my god to heal him. he will come out of this because he is a fighter. that we havesaid arrived back in the land of venezuela. thank you, lord. we will continue our treatment here. it was characteristically bombastic. onwards to victory. we will live and overcome. it was unclear whether or not he actually tweeted that.
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his condition remains a mystery. on state tv they applauded his return, but failed to mention his health. journalists try to find out more. this journalist wants to know about the president's treatment. this is the reply. >> the president is going to begin a new phase of treatment. >> it is impossible for an venezuelans to judge whether or not hugo chavez is fit enough to be their president. he has not appeared in public for weeks. it is left to his supporters to boast about his recovery. he did not arrive in a structure or on a wheelchair. the president will come -- continue to manage maleki always has. the government has not explained why it hugo chavez has returns now. ministers admit that he is in a continued battle with cancer.
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>> for more on the return of hugo chavez to venezuela and what the future of the country holds, i spoke with the president of the inter-american dialogue. hugo chavez is back in venezuela. part of venezuelans any wiser about their president's conditioned? >> there is a lot of speculation and rumors. he has not said anything for a couple of months now. one assumes that he assumes thatill. you do not know what kind of cancer that he has. >> who is running the country? >> the vice-president seems to be in charge. there are other leaders of chavez's party that are being consulted. chavez is still alive. he may not be able to talk, but he is still communicating in some way. >> he has not been sworn in as
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president for his next term in office. do you expect that he will be sworn in? >> he could be sworn in on january 10. he could be sworn in now by the supreme court. he could possibly resigned and the vice-president will take over and there would be elections. that is a likely scenario. >> is this the slow and to the chavez era? >> and it looks that way. all of the signs are there. it is possible that he comes back and resumed the presidency. it appears that this is the end and he has something very, very serious. >> what does this mean for the country? >> the likelihood is that his team is probably in control. nobody has his charisma or ability to hold things together. it's there is likely to be a lot of power struggles. the opposition has a major
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challenge of trying to get its act together. >> do you expect his successor to have a change relative to the u.s.? >> there are going to be some challenges -- channels of communications. i do not expect best friends between america and united states but i expect the town to get better. it is in a terrible state. they have the highest inflation in latin america. they have food court -- of food shortages all over the place. that is why hugo chavez has come back to calm things down. they are in for a rough time. >> any guess on who the successor might be? >> his current vice-president is in the best position. hugo chavez designated him in december. he does not have his charisma, but he is in the strongest position right now. >> in other news, a former u.s.
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prosecutor house called for the international court to investigate war crimes in syria. he is working on an inquiry into the syrian conflict, reporting on human-rights violations of both sides. including the use of mass executions and the imprisonment of children. evidence has gathered more than 500 syrian refugees. people have been reported to be wounded in a clash at mines in south africa. it's they were wounded by rubber bullets and machetes as fights broke out between rival trade unions. the mine is run by anglo- american. battalion, filipino, and greek, the lebanese employees are said to be among those seized in the biggest kidnapping in northern nigeria in recent times. a radical islamist group says
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that it is behind the abductions. it's back to time -- thailand where bomb and arson attacks took place over the weekend. they see this as retaliation for the deaths of 16 islamist militants last week. it restarted its campaign for an independent islamic state nine years ago. john reports. there are some distressing images. >> this is a land of fear, not smiles. 60,000 thai soldiers trapped in a decade-long war of attrition with the insurgents. slipped., the mask a failed attack on a thai military base let 60 militants dead. their movement is no longer
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faceless. astonishingly, three of them lived next door to each other, just a short drive from the base. a procession of friends and relatives are arrives the following day to consult the families. he has been left with three young daughters to look after. she knew her husband was a wanted man. he stayed away and the army often searched her home. her feelings are mixed. she misses him, she says. he told me that he was proud that his son had died fighting for his beliefs. would you want any of the year surviving sons to follow him? >> i tried to stop them. they do not always listen to me. as dead men were buried martyrs to the cause of an independent islamic state. they accept their death as a fitting end.
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the commander of the raid was a 38-year-old man with multiple arrest warrants at a price on his head, but he is admired in his own community. his young son will never know his father. she is adamant that his death was worth it. that his death was a noble one. how many others in this troubled region of thailand feel the same? people rarely speak openly. sympathy for the insurgents is strong. this attack may look like a victory for the authorities. they cannot break the powerful hold that the insurgency hold on so many young muslim men in this region. is, believe it or not, a primary school. government's schools are seen as
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legitimate targets at by insurgents. last month, they killed a teacher here in front of the children. the running of this school takes particular courage and dedication. many of its teachers have already asked to be transferred. >> it we are afraid to leave the house. we do not know what we will phase out of the road. with the soldiers here to protect us, we feel a bit safer. >> these soldiers keep doing what they have done for the past 10 years. patrolling and hunting for an enemy which is everywhere and nowhere. >> of the insurgency in southern thailand. britain wants to be your partner of choice. that was the message which david cameron delivered in mumbai today. going to india, cameron is leading a delegation of more
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than 100 british c e zero's and investors to strengthen ties. the divide between rich and poor is one of the greatest in the world in mumbai. >> the competition for the most vibrant, noisy, an overcrowded city on earth, mumbai would be right up there. the contrasts and contradictions are striking. >> wow. a is 30-years old, businessman. they are thinking of upgrading. he went out on a test drive. >> the back and the front of this car looks the way it does with the lights. aside when they see you. that is a fantastic feeling to just accelerate. >> not everyone is able to live in mumbai's fast lane.
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all cities have their divisions between rich and poor. rarely do you see it in such an extreme form as you do in mumbai. there is no running water and sewage runs down the alleyway. this is nothing like as bad as it gets. one person describes this as a middle-class slum. where do you wash? >> this woman showed me around her 1-room house. this room is about 3 meters by 3 meters. it is home to five people. who lives here? you live here and your children? and your husband? and your mother-in-law? how do you all fit? it is very small. it is a tighte squeeze. they have got mats on the floor.
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>> i want to know what jobs you want to do when you grow up. an airplane? what about you? engineered? a very good. what about you? teacher. you want to become a teacher as well. once upon a time, these would have been dismissed as impossible dreams. though there is a long way to go, there is a growing belief that in a -- in an increasingly prosperous india, anything is possible. >> you are watching "bbc world news america." a look back on a political marriage that the stranger than fiction. the relationship between two top u.s. presidents, richard nixon and dwight eisenhower. here in the u.s., there has been
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a fierce debate over taxing sugary sodas and junk food. we are not alone. james has more on the fight in britain. >> and britons are getting better -- and bigger. more than one of four adults are obese and fatty foods and drinks are a reason why. doctors say it is one of the greatest threats to public health in the 20th century, contributing to diabetes, heart attacks, and cancer. more fizzy drinks are being sold and ever before with sodas making up more than half of the total amount. the government must take action by stopping on a tax which will push prices up by at least 20%. >> they are just water and sugar and calories. let's put a tax on those and tried to encourage people to drink more coffee drinks.
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>> it is not just fizzy pops that doctors have in their sights. they want to see fewer fast-food outlets near schools, a ban on the fatty food advertising before 9:00 p.m.. drink manufacturers say that they are not to blame for a bloated britain. soft drinks contribute just 2% to daily calorie intake. >> we need a holistic approach which addresses the issue of people's 5 styles. exercise and the kind of diet they have overall. the holistic approach is better long-term them this cheap stunt. >> the department of health says that there is the single answer to the obesity problem. it is up to everyone, government, industry, health professionals, and individuals themselves to work towards healthy eating and lifestyles.
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>> said it is president stay here in the u.s., we are taking a look at two remarkable icons. east dwight eisenhower and richard nixon. the two men were at the center of the american political stage for over to the p.o. decades. it's even though nixon was eisenhower's vice-president, said they had a tense and often distrustful relationship. he writes about it in his new book. i spoke with him a little bit earlier. you remember eisenhower as a war hero and richard nixon as the disgraced president brought low by watergate. worthy meant more similar than we think? >> there personalities could not have been more different. nixon would always be nixon, always insecure. eisenhower but always be eisenhower.
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i asked somebody what he was like and they said that he would go all five star on you. >> eisenhower was very suspicious of political -- corera politicians. why did he choose him? >> he did not choose them. when eisenhower was nominated for president in 1952, he was not even aware that he made a choice. i am the one who does it? as opposed to the delegates. yes, it is you. >> why was the relationship so difficult for nixon? >> nixon was always wasawe of eisenhower. nixon was not a disgrace president, he was a first-term senator with a slightly strange background. he was joining the supreme commander of the allied forces. he was in awe of him.
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there was not the attraction between a father and son. there was the 22-year age difference. >> in 1960, eisenhower put not credit nixon with influencing any phase of his administration. >> eisenhower was asked at a press conference in august about a month after nixon was nominated, can you think about one substantial suggestions or ideas that was adopted, eisenhower said that if you give me a week, i will think of one. eisenhower was slightly annoyed because nixon kept referring to the nixon-eisenhower administration. nixon said that he did not mean for it to come out that way. >> it is natural to wonder bank watergate would have happened bank eisenhower was still alive. >> i do not think it would have. i do not think that nixon would
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have done certain things. >> what would he not have done? did it very carefully. he had a wonderful secretary who took down every word. he would have advised that nixon to get out of vietnam more quickly. eisenhower very cleverly did not involved in indochina. he said, let's ask congress, knowing that congress did not want to be in an asian land war. >> how will that had prevented watergate? >> that is a separate question. c and eisenhower, nixon would have been too embarrassed by it. he would have said, what are you doing? eisenhower's brothers said i am so glad that my brother did not live to see the things that this man did, but had he lived, i do not believe he would have done
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those things. eisenhower had a great interest in foreign policy. he was not really familiar what domestic policy. he had never really lived in this country. he was at west point, panama, and then the war. you give him credit to have wonderful instincts about war and peace. he knew when to go to war and why not to. xbox thank you for joining us. now for the latest gori in our big part dream series. it's just cut was born without arms due to a rare birth defect. if you think that's beaut her down, you can think again. she can do everything from flying a plane to playing a piano. she tells us how she has overcome adversity and what inspired her. >> my name is jessica. i live in tucson, arizona. i am a motivational speaker. i travel the country.
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situation of being born without arms requires a lot of creativity. a lot of kids around me are climbing up the monkey bars or climbing up the slide. for me, i felt somewhat frustrated. i was prevented from that. i wanted to climb up that slide just like the other kids. flying overt i was the playground and being superwoman. i realized that i needed to adapt. it was not about catering to my needs or my special situation, but it was more about me adopting and being creative and coming up with ways of using my feet or using other methods to become independent. i put my pants onto the hook and then i just ducked into the pants like this. and i wiggle my way into my pants.
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i have heard the saying one- hundred times that of life is 10% what happens to u.s. and 90% high you respond to it. psychology fascinates me in that sense. >> ♪ amazing grace how sweet the sound ♪ >> i would want to become a pilot. i would have to find a specific airplane. it has two outlets controls than the standard airplanes. i can put my right foot here and my left foot on the throttle. the most incredible, most in powering the experience i have ever had.
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free,eeling of being being in the sky, that incredible feeling of being up there. i enjoy not really knowing where i will be next. in the next four months, i will be in four different countries. i will go to areas of ethiopia and visit with families and help them overcome their own issues and develop the confidence that i have had to develop over the years and share that with them. the people that i am most proud of is maturing from someone that was angry and upset about being differently able and being different to now being able to celebrate that. and using the opportunity to give hope and inspiration to
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other people. is an just caught cox example to all of us with her amazing life. we will have more of the big dreams series right here next week. that brings to the 's broadcast to a close. you can continue to watch "bbc world news" on our 24 hour news that board. simply checked your listings. to reach me and most of the bbc team, just reach us on twitter. for all of us here at "world news america" thanks for watching and see you back here tomorrow. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. union bank. fidelity investments.
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>> and united healthcare. >> music is the universal language. when i was an accident, i was worried that the health-care system spoke a language all of the sun. with united healthcare, i got help with my life, some connection to doctors, and a total estimate of what my family costs. i never missed a beat. >> we are 70,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that is strength in numbers, united healthcare. >> your personal economy is made up of the things that matter most, including your career. as those things change, fidelity can help you readjust your retirement plan, rethink how you are invested, and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today, a fidelity ira has a wide range of investment choices that can fit your personal economy.
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fidelity investments, turn here. fidelity investments, turn here.
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- (yawning): hi, neighbor. today i'm going to get ready for school. and tonight we can pretend to be superheroes before bed! i'm excited to be with you all day. and i'll be right back. is made possible in part by...
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the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. the neighborhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along
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- ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ - hi, neighbor. it's me, tigey. daniel's being a sleepyhead this morning. you want to go wake him up? let's go. (daniel snoring softly) ready? let's say, "wake up, daniel tiger." wake up, daniel tiger. (daniel yawns.) - good morning, tigey. hi, dad. - good morning. (daniel yawns.) - oh, hi, neighbor.
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- what a beautiful day in the neighborhood. - wow! ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day to say good morning to you ♪ ♪ good morning! - ♪ good morning - ♪ good morning - ♪ good morning to you! - good morning. muah! - good morning to you. i think i have to go potty. - definitely need to go in the morning when you wake up. - ♪ if you have to go potty, stop, and go right away ♪ ♪ flush and wash and be on your way ♪ ♪ mm mm mm mm mm oopsie daisy. grr! - ok, it's time for me to get ready for work.

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